Cycle 1 Week 17- Michelangelo

When I think of Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel ceiling, I picture him lying on his back atop huge scaffolds, working in this position for years and years.  I’m not sure if I was formerly taught this, but come to find out, it’s a widespread misconception!  He did work atop tall scaffolds, but stood upright with his head craned back to paint.  Not surprisingly, that dude was fed up with the Sistine Chapel ceiling by the time he was done.  

The Michelangelo project in Discovering Great Artists, p. 25, still goes off the assumption that Michelangelo laid on his back to paint the ceiling.  The directions in my lesson plan mimic this, as it is much easier to tape paper under a table than to erect scaffolding to reach the ceiling, but if you find a solution that allows students to stand and paint above their heads, please share!  

Continue Reading →

Cycle 1 Week 16- Durer

Durer created beautiful masterpieces in all sorts of media, from oil paint to watercolor, and etchings to woodblock prints.  His prints were beyond compare, especially for the time period, and still wow us today.  One of his most famous woodblock prints is Rhinoceros, and so this lesson plan focuses on animal subject matter for creating our own prints.  Durer also did wonderful watercolors of animals, full of texture and detail, which we can also use to inspire our students. 

Continue Reading →

Cycle 1 Week 15- Angelico

Fra Angelico is well-known for his altarpieces and frescoes, his most notable being The Annunciation painted in the Convent of San Marco in Florence, Italy.  He painted several paintings on this same theme throughout his life, but this is by far his most well-known work.  To help students get a firm grasp on his subject matter, we will be replicating another of his images of the Annunciation, but one that is much simpler.  The Annunciatory Angel  also depicts Gabriel announcing to Mary that she will be the mother of the Christ and shows the golden halo typical of the time. Continue Reading →

Cycle 1 Week 14- Ghiberti

Ghiberti’s masterpiece, dubbed the “Gates of Paradise”, are beautiful relief panels adorning the doors of the Baptistry of San Giovanni in Florence.  It took over twenty years for Ghiberti to complete this project!  He first carved wax molds, then cast them in bronze, and then polished, sanded, and incised details.  Finally, he covered them with a layer of gold.  Twenty years on the same project takes a lot of dedication!

Our twenty-first century replica is to use wax wikki stix, dull pencils, and aluminum foil to create the same thing in half an hour.  Well, maybe not the same thing, but you get the idea. Continue Reading →

Cycle 1 Week 13- Giotto

Get a box handy, ’cause you’re going to be packing in a lot of stuff for this project.  It’s a super fun activity and totally worth the extra prep time and supplies!

Giotto di Bondone was an Italian painter and architect during the late Middle Ages.  He created beautiful frescoes and also did tempera paintings on wood panels, which is what our students will be mimicking.  Tempera paint allows for vivid color (medieval artists even used toxic substances like arsenic and mercury to get these colors.  Yikes.) that has retained its vibrancy for hundreds of years.  While chalk isn’t quite the same as what Giotto used, it’s a fun substitute to learn about pre-Renaissance painting techniques.

To get started, here’s the supply list.  Some have links to the items on amazon.

 

Here is the Cycle 1 Week 13- Giotto lesson plan and printable images.